How to Make the Google Ad Grants Program Work for Your Nonprofit

Last December, Google communicated forthcoming changes for its Google Ad Grants program. The changes were scheduled to be implemented on January 1. However, it appears that Google is giving account owners some time to make necessary adjustments.

The program provides up to $10,000 USD in AdWords advertising to eligible nonprofits, with some restrictions.

Some of the program changes are good (such as the removal of the $2 bid limit).

But other changes may create new challenges. In particular, the new 5% CTR rule might create some difficulties, especially if your nonprofit operates in a highly competitive market.

In my latest column in Search Engine Land, I take a closer look at these Google Ad Grants program changes and describe how nonprofits can work with—and around—the new rules.

Google Ad Grants changes

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